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Buying Guide

Whether you're ready to make your first ever knife purchase or a knife enthusiast looking for a special addition to your collection, here are a few things to consider.

Blade Style

Depending on the type of work you do, you may need a blade with more slicing, push cuts, draw or pull cuts. See Blade Styles for more info.

Opening System

Some people prefer a manual opening folder, some prefer a bit of assisted opening, and some like it fully automatic at the push of a buttton. With any of these opening systems, most Kershaw folders can be opened with one hand. See Opening Systems for more info.

Opens With

If you prefer to open your knife a with your index finger, choose a knife with a flipper, located at the back of the blade. If you like to open a folder with your thumb, choose a model with a thumb stud or thumb disk. A push button model (usually an automatic) opens best with the thumb (or index finger for left-handed users). Some manual models open two-handed with a nail nick. See Opening Systems for more info.

Lock Type

The design of each Kershaw folder incorporates a lock that is either built into the handle scale, adjacent to it, part of the opening push button, or a traditional detent. Which Lock Type you prefer may influence which Kershaw folder you choose. See Lock Types for more info.

 

Blade Steel

If your daily work includes sustained knife use, you may want a high-end steel blade. Kershaw blades are made from a range of steels, each with their own strengths in edge retention, corrosion resistance, and sharpening ease. Choose a blade steel that matches your frequency of use, what materials you are cutting, and your sharpening system. See Blade Steels for more info.

Blade Edge

While most Kershaw blades feature a sharp plain edge, a few incorporate partial serration. This can be helpful for cutting rope and similar tasks. See Blade Edges & Grinds for more info.

Handle Material

A handle material like G10, rubber overmold or glass-filled nylon can add texture and grip to a knife. Consider your working conditions, whether you are outdoors, wearing gloves, or in a wet environment. Or you may simply prefer the feel and aesthetics of an aluminum or steel handle. See Handle Materials for more info.